[Tony Joseph] Read online Early Indians Ebook – PDF, Kindle ePUB & TXT


  • Hardcover
  • 256
  • Early Indians
  • Tony Joseph
  • English
  • 17 March 2018
  • 9789386228987

10 thoughts on “Early Indians

  1. says:

    Indians are a people who are always a bit confused about their identity as “Indians” – maybe because the nation itself is a relatively recent construct not ignoring the mythical “Bharata” and the regional and caste identities are strongly embedded Ever since the West discovered the mystic East there have been attempts to create an Indian past which is wholly spiritual – based on the mythical Vedic “Aryan” – by th

  2. says:

    India has had a weird relationship with its history prior to Mauryan empire History by its nature is imprecise but in this case confusion is compounded by the fact that Harappan script remains undeciphered and there are very few archaeological remains of Vedic society The confusion has only been furthered by ideologically motivated or imaginative thinkers who have colored this phase of history with their own

  3. says:

    Everyone in our subcontinent Pakistanis Indians Bangladeshis please read EARLY INDIANS by Tony Joseph Understand where we're coming from how rich and diverse our roots are and how superficial our divisions are And it's all based on scientific evidence not ideological wishful thinking

  4. says:

    As India enters the third decade of the twenty first century one would presume that modern science would form the focus of an emerging nation of young people like India But uantum computing artificial intelligence and advanced medical research do not dominate the conversations Instead India is bogged down by uestions such as 'who is acceptable as an Indian citizen' and 'how to build a very tall temple in Ayodhya' etc T

  5. says:

    Tony Joseph’s new book “Early Indians The Story of Our Ancestors and Where We Came From” attempts to sell the colonial Aryan Invasion Theory's insidious 21st century version the Aryan Migration Myth on the basis of racist Hinduphobic Harv

  6. says:

    There is an image of the famous dancing girl of Harappa on the cover of this book as a nod perhaps to common knowledge that Early Indians for most of us refers to the Harappan Civilization Then we are told came the Aryans who somehow settled peacefully or not with the Harappans Think of it have you ever asked yourself where did th

  7. says:

    The whole book was based on the Aryan Invasion theory It is good to note that there is some evidence which debunks this theory Rakhigarhi DNA study uestions Aryan invasion theory claims the authorThe findings are based on t

  8. says:

    After Rakhigarhi study this book is very outdated now In his book he claimed there is decisive proof that Vedic

  9. says:

    Two terms that refer to linguistic groups are widely misunderstood in India and taken to be racial denominators that split the country into two demographic zones in the north and the south We know them as ‘Aryan’ and ‘Dravidian’ The former is broadly associated with the north and the latter with the south commonly in the

  10. says:

    Where did the first Indians come from Who were the Harappans really Who were the ‘Aryans’ who wrote the Rigveda and are supposed to have fostered the ‘Brahminical culture’ that has been so integral a part of Indian life for so many centuries In Early Indians Tony Joseph sets out to explore these uestions and some

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Tony Joseph ↠ 6 characters

Early Indians

Heavily on path breaking DNA research of recent years But it also presents earlier archaeological and linguistic evidence all in an entertaining and highly readable manner A hugely significant book Early Indians authoritatively and bravely puts to rest several ugly debates on the ancestry of modern Indians It not only shows us how the modern Indian population came to be composed as it is but also reveals an undeniable and important truth about who we are we are all migrants And we are all mixe The whole book was based on the Aryan Invasion theory It is good to note that there is some evidence which debunks this theory Rakhigarhi DNA study uestions Aryan invasion theory claims the authorThe findings are based on the study of the ancient genome in the skeletons excavated from RakhigarhiRead ateconomictimesindiatimescomarticlesIn the later parts of the book the author claimed there was a shred of archaeological evidence that the native people of Indus valley worshipped a tall pillar like structure probably Lingam which is considered as phallus worship then Aryans dismantled the indigenous beliefs and points out the denouncing of SHISHNA DEVA literally phallus worship I was fortunate enough to be doing a course on Vedas and Upanishads in Oxford Centre of Hindu Studies Online and asked a scholar about the above claim Daniel Simpson who is one of the teachers replied to me As far as I am aware the Rig Veda only makes a couple of references to shishnadeva a compound formed from i na meaning tail or penis and deva a term for a deity related to the English word divine It can be understood as one whose god is the phallus but might just mean lustful One of these references in a hymn to Indra Rig Veda 7215 was translated in the 19th century as let not the lewd approach our holy worship A recent translation by the scholars Joel Brereton and Stephanie Jamison says Sorcerers do not incite us Indra nor sycophants with their knowing wiles o most powerful one He Indra will vaunt himself over the stranger over the race contrary to our ways Let the phallus worshipers not penetrate our truthThey explain this as follows Here various threats to the truth of our people are rendered helpless by our resistance and Indra s power threats internal to the community namely sorcerers and flatterers and the stranger an rya but an enemy people who deviate from our ways and phallus worshipers presumably non ryas outside itIt is not at all clear what this means There is no mention of lingam worship in the Rig Veda as it is understood today ie involving a symbol linked to Shiva It seems likely that this line just distinguishes the Vedic religion from pre existing folk traditions perhaps including what scholars call fertility cultsThe other reference again in a hymn to Indra Rig Veda 10993 is even obscure It includes a line about someone perhaps Indra smashing the phallus worshipers in the latest translation or saying he slew the lustful demons in the 19th century version However there is plenty of war like language in the text and it s not reserved for shishnadeva The nomadic tribes of early Vedic times were apparently asking gods for help in battlesWe know very little about earlier traditions because they left few records The free standing columns found in the Indus Valley don t really tell us much about the place of what Tony Joseph calls phallus worship so it seems a bit far fetched to conclude that the Vedas sought to stamp it out based on these verses and some damaged archeological relics

characters Ô PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Tony Joseph

Who are we IndiansWhere did we come fromMany of us believe our ancestors have lived in South Asia since 'time immemorial' But as it turns out 'time immemorial' may not have been all that long ago To tell us the story of our ancestry journalist Tony Joseph goes 65000 years into the past when a band of modern humans or Homo sapiens first made their way from Africa into the Indian subcontinent Citing recent DNA evidence he traces the subseuent large migrations of modern humans into India of agricu Everyone in our subcontinent Pakistanis Indians Bangladeshis please read EARLY INDIANS by Tony Joseph Understand where we re coming from how rich and diverse our roots are and how superficial our divisions are And it s all based on scientific evidence not ideological wishful thinking

review Early Indians

Lturalists from Iran between 7000 and 3000 BCE and pastoralists from the Central Asian Steppe between 2000 and 1000 BCE among others As Joseph unravels our history using the results of genetic and other research he takes head on some of the most controversial and uncomfortable uestions of Indian history Who were the Harappans Did the 'Aryans' really migrate to India Are North Indians genetically different from South Indians And are the various castes genetically distinct groups This book relies There is an image of the famous dancing girl of Harappa on the cover of this book as a nod perhaps to common knowledge that Early Indians for most of us refers to the Harappan Civilization Then we are told came the Aryans who somehow settled peacefully or not with the Harappans Think of it have you ever asked yourself where did the Harappans come from The author tries to answer this rather grand uestion in 230 pages Starting almost 300000 years ago with the evolution of man this breathless book attempts to combine everything that is happening in the world of ancient DNA archaeology and linguistics to answer the uestion who were the Early Indians and where or how the hell did they get here That the book is up to date is an understatement There are references to papers from 2018 conjuring in me the image of Tony Joseph running to the press with yet another update as the exasperated printer looks annoyed But happily for us readers every scrap of development included seems important We are just not used to history working this way and this is exciting the field of Ancient DNA is answering important uestions about history at a pace that makes historians look like astronauts It tells us that the first humans out of Africa came to India some 65000 years ago This of course makes Harappans look positively modern and then goes on to tell the story of Early Indians in a rather comprehensive manner for such a slim book Constantly digressing to provide primers on subjects such as mitochondrial DNA and Linguistic archaeology this ambitious book though not exactly a romping read nevertheless constructs an edifice that adds to the history of sub continent I suspect this is not the end of the line for such books and we will see many that will tackle the same subject but this is the first I ve read My only criticism of the book is just that it isn t a romping enough read I wish Tony Joseph had brought to the writing of this book the same ability to tell a story he so brilliantly possesses in book discussions That gap for a book that could be classified as popular history might alas reduce its audience Besides this one observation I totally recommend this book to anyone who reads Indian history