Toni Morrison ( Kindle ePUB Pdf ) Paradise


  • Paperback
  • 318
  • Paradise
  • Toni Morrison
  • English
  • 10 February 2019
  • 9780099288046

10 thoughts on “Paradise

  1. says:

    Sometimes you have to hold up your hands as a reader and admit maybe you didn’t do a book justice I found Paradise really difficult to follow Mainly this is due to there being no central character The central character instead is a town called Ruby where only blacks live and are free of white legislation and a nearby building known as the

  2. says:

    They shoot the white girl first but the rest they can take their time No need to hurry out here They are 17 miles from a town which has 90 miles between it and any other Hiding places will be plentiful in the convent but th

  3. says:

    The moment I wake up before I put on my makeup I say a little prayer for you but on that in a moment Reading this after reading The Bluest Eye is probably like reading Dubliners and then following it with Finnegans Wake Well maybe n

  4. says:

    Why is it that so often in life the very thing you’re trying to avoid becomes you Why do the oppressed become the oppressor Why do

  5. says:

    This is the most complex book I have read from Toni Morrison It is the story of a black community called Ruby in rural Oklahoma in the 70s and the reaction to a female commune of sorts called the Convent out on the edge of the town At issue here is skin tone the 8 rock dark black founders and their suspicions towards those with lig

  6. says:

    I swear it's the most fulfilling when you read an author and you have ambiguous feelings towards them and their writing But being an unbiased fair desperately enthusiastic reader; you come back to give it a second try and it will be with that second book that you make your definitive judgement towards the author — either you like them or

  7. says:

    Paradise is one of my favourite words I believe it came first from an ancient word in Farsi that means only a park which says something about the Iranian idea of a park perhaps I think paradise is a place of welcome and peace and love and in this book I think that is what the founders of the town Ruby wanted to create at a safe distance fr

  8. says:

    Paradise was not well received upon its publication in 1997—influential critics like Michiko Kakutani James Wood and Zoë Heller disparaged it and even Oprah's audience instructed to read it for the talk show host's book club demurred prompting Oprah to call Morrison to offer the viewers encouragement One of the studi

  9. says:

    There are few authors that can make me feel as stupid as Morrison makes me feel time and time again This novel centers on a small community in rural Oklahoma founded as a safe place for black families that had faced prejudice and a former co

  10. says:

    Why did I read this book before reading Beloved and Jazz when it is supposed to complete the trilogy I'm bummed by that I couldn't help it I found the book on my shelf and decided to read it along with The Bluest Eye Then there I was reading it and thinking why was this book not titled “Beware the Furrow of His Brow” or “Furrow of His brow” or “The Oven” I won’t spoil it you will have to read i

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Toni Morrison ´ 9 characters

Paradise

Kes clashes that have bedevilled American society between race and racelessness; patriarchy and matriarchy; religion and magic; freedom and belonging; promicuity and fidelity Magnificent in its scope PARADISE is a revelation in the intensity of its portrayal of human complexity and in the sheer force of its narrative There are few authors that can make me feel as stupid as Morrison makes me feel time and time again This novel centers on a small community in rural Oklahoma founded as a safe place for black families that had faced prejudice and a former convent nearly 20 miles away that has become a refuge for broken women The stories of these women intertwine with the people of the town of Ruby As the women slowly heal their psychological wounds the town slowly experiences fractures and tension Finally the leading men of the town decide that these women who do not need men who flaunt their sexuality and possibly practice witchcraft is the cause of the town s problems Although they manage to destroy the community of women it is not clear if they destroy the individual women Of course this violent act does nothing to heal the town In this novel Morrison explores racial hierarchies the tension between patriarchal systems and feminism and group cohesion and the fear of the outsider I found this novel very difficult to follow Stories wove in and out of one another the focal point changing without any signal I know I missed 75% of what was really going on in this book

Summary ✓ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ´ Toni Morrison

Four young women are brutally attacked in a convent near an all black town in America in the mid 1970s The inevitability of this attack and the attempts to avert it lie at the heart of PARADISE Spanning the birth of the Civil Rights movement Vietnam the counter culture and the politics of the late 70s deftly manipula The moment I wake up before I put on my makeup I say a little prayer for you but on that in a moment Reading this after reading The Bluest Eye is probably like reading Dubliners and then following it with Finnegans Wake Well maybe not uite I wouldn t know as I haven t read either one but this one is definitely much denser than The Bluest Eye and has a cast of characters as large as the Bible It s not something you read with the TV on in the background or while having a conversation with your spouseNot unmanageable and certainly not unenjoyable there s a wedding scene that is simply mesmerizing or should I say Divine hence the song from My Best Friend s Wedding you know where Julia Roberts sits annoyed and horrified as the whole family breaks into song I would compare it to one of those jigsaw puzzles where the main image on closer inspection is composed of hundreds of smaller images Despite it being divided into sections based on characters you don t get a single character s whole story in their section Just keep on reading

characters Paradise

Ting past present and future this novel of mysterious motives reveals the interior lives of the citizens of the town with astonishing clarity The drama of its people from the four young women and their elderly protector to conservative businessmen rednecks a Civil Rights minister and veterans of three wars richly evo This is the most complex book I have read from Toni Morrison It is the story of a black community called Ruby in rural Oklahoma in the 70s and the reaction to a female commune of sorts called the Convent out on the edge of the town At issue here is skin tone the 8 rock dark black founders and their suspicions towards those with lighter skin The book starts with describing a massacre and then goes back to paint in the details of the lives of the women and the story of the town The narration is highly variable and not always easy to follow I realize how important this book is and recognize the wonderful writing but dropped a star from the lack of fluidity in the reading of the text and the confusion that this entailed The book begins rather violently with one of Toni s most powerful opening sentencesThey shoot the white girl first With the rest they can take their time No need to hurry out here p 3Morrison discusses her choice of this phrase in the afterward and it definitely leaves an impression on the reader It sets the expectation of a frenetic pace although the book does slow down until the last chapter Save Marie Each chapter is named after one of the women starting with Ruby who dies before the story starts and gave her name to the town The next chapter Mavis also starts out strongThe neighbors seemed please when the babies smothered Probably because the mint green Cadillac in which they died had annoyed them for some time p 21 Mavis story tragic spousal abuse and poverty but she runs away to the Convent to join the handful of women living there where she first meets ConnieYou all ain t scared out here by yourselves Don t seem like there s nothing for miles outsideConnie laughed Scary things not always outside Most scary things is inside p 39The next character we meet is Grace or GigiEither the pavement was burning or she had sapphires hidden in her shoes p 53 On her way to Ruby her erstwhile train companion wants some ice and the racist salesman wants to charge him a nickelListen you Give him the ice you weren t going to charge me for okayMiss do I have to call the conductorIf you don t I will This is train robbery all right trains robbing peopleIt s all right said the man Just a nickelIt s the principle said GigiA five cent principle ain t no principle at all The man needs a nickel Needs it real bad p 66 Small but meaningful exchanges such as this abound in Morrison s writing always with a little moral in them here the price of a principleIn the next chapter Seneca we learn a bit about Ruby and the residents of the town the Oven the scandal around the motto engraved on the Oven a central piece of their community symbolizing their flight from Reconstruction to Oklahoma and freedom Furrow of His Brow and how it came to be interpreted re interpreted in the community What is striking is the many uses to which Morrison puts language This passage beautifully uses color as a mixed metaphorEven now the verbena scent was clear even now the summer dresses the creamy sunlit skin excited him If he and Steward had thrown themselves off the railing they would have burst into tears So among the vivid details of the journey the sorrow the stubbornness the cunning the wealth Deek s image of the nineteen summertime ladies was unlike the photographer s His remembrance was pastel colored and eternal p 110 Seneca is abandoned by her sister and in turns abandons her deadbeat boyfriend in a prison and winds up at the ConventThe next chapter Divine gives us back story on Ruby and introduces Pallas who the girls at the Convent decide to name Divine after her mother DiDi Her story is the most tragic of all although the story of Billie Delia comes close I found her story with the horse to be very moving The chapter however starts with a sermon from Father Misner of one of the three competing churches in RubyLet me tell you about love that silly word you believe is about whether you like somebody or whether somebody likes you or whether you can put up with somebody in order to get something or someplace you want or you believe it has to do with how your body responds to another body like robins or bison or maybe you believe love is how forces or nature or luck is benign to you in particular not maiming or killing you but if so doing it for your own good Love is none of that There is nothing in nature like that Not in robins or bison or in the banging tails of your hunting dogs and not in blossoms or suckling foal Love is divine only and difficult always If you think it is easy you are a fool If you think it is natural than you are blind It is a learned application without reason or motive except that it is God p 141This sets the tone for how the religious community will respond to the Convent later in the story although Misner will be horrified by itThe next chapter goes to one of the central personalities in Ruby Patricia who is obsessed with family trees and old stories I think it was my favorite chapter perhaps because the narrative shifts were far less violent but also because the language is perfectly beautiful as she tries to glean information about the families the people of Ruby clam upThings got out of hand when she asked to see letters and marriage certificates The women narrowed their eyes before smiling and offering to refresh her coffee Invisible doors closed and the conversation turned to weather p 187 It is also in this chapter that we learn her theory about black on black racism The original founders of Ruby were a deep black color that she uses the mining term 8 rock the deepest darkest level of the mine for Trying to keep the purity of their black blood the founders tended to look down at lighter skin tones Later this has catastrophic conseuences for the Convent Remember that first line Later in a conversation with Reverend MisnerYou re wrong and that s your field you re plowing wet Slavery is our past Nothing can change that certainly not AfricaWe live in the world Pat The whole world Separating us isolating us that s always been their weapon Isolation kills generations It has no futureYou think they don t love their childrenMisner stroked his upper lip and heaved a long sigh I think they love them to death p 210The Convent is run by Consolata the subject of the next chapter In the good clean darkness of the cellar Consolata woke to the wrenching disappointment of not having died the night before p 221 She is the last of the nuns that once populated the Convent Her wine cave is well stocked and she serves as a guru and muse to the women that come live at the Convent She falls in love with one of the community founders who is married of course in their respective youth Speeding toward the unforseeable sitting next to him who was darker than the darkness they split Consolata let the feathers unfold and come unstuck from the walls of a stone cold womb Out here where wind was not a help or a threat to sunflowers nor the moon a language of time of weather of sowing or harvesting but a feature of the original world designed for the two of them p 229 Unfortunately for Consolata her lover dumps her and returns to his family The next to last chapter is about one of the other Ruby residents that has had limited contact with the Convent Lone Toni saves the last chapter Save Marie for the massacre scene announced in the opening line and its dreadful conseuences The book ends with several of the women survivors and returns to a metaphor of Piedade which was introduced earlier in the book I found the closing paragraph uite beautiful When the ocean heaves sending rhythns of water ashore Piedade looks to see what has come Another ship perhaps but different heading to port crew and passengers lost and saved atremble for they have been disconsolate for some time Now they will rest before shouldering the endless work they were created to do down here in paradise p 318As I said earlier this is definitely not one of Morrison s easier works but it is still rewarding and merits several reads to get all the layers that she was laid down here Fino s Toni Morrison ReviewsThe Bluest EyeSulaSong Of SolomonTar BabyBelovedJazzParadise