(epub) Pearl A New Verse Translation By Unknown – Book, Kindle or eBook

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S another beloved Medieval English masterpiece thought to be by the same anonymous author and housed in the same original fourteenth century manuscript Honoring the rhythms and alliterative music of the original Armitage’s virtuosic translation describes a man mourning the loss of his. I read this book as part of the Book Riot Read Harder 2017 Challenge This challenge was to read a book of poetry in translation on a theme other than love Super specificPearl is a translation of a medieval work written ca 1390s and tells the story of a grieving man who has lost his Perle We come to understand that Perle is his deceased daughter As the grieving father goes to visit the place where she died he falls into a trance and envisions her in an ethereally beautiful dress and speaking to him from the other side of a river he cannot cross She tells him that she has risen to an important place by God s side and after uestioning and arguing with her he comes to accept that she is gone and goes to follow her to the next life but is jolted awake just before he can make it there Written in old English this translation comes from Armitage a translator who specializes in medieval writings and it reads like a modern text in his hands This version has the original text on the pages that face the translation and as unintelligible as old English is to me I enjoyed comparing the two marveling each time how Artmitage has preserved the rhythm and alliteration of the original and made it palatable to modern readers On Tidy Endings fourteenth century manuscript Honoring the rhythms and alliterative music of the original Armitage’s virtuosic translation describes a man mourning the loss of his. I read this book as part of the Book Riot Read Harder 2017 Challenge This challenge was to read a book of poetry in translation on a theme other than love Super specificPearl is a translation of a medieval work written ca 1390s and tells the story of a grieving man who has lost his Perle We come to understand that Perle is his deceased daughter As the grieving Flat World Navigation father goes to visit the place where she died he A House of My Own Stories from My Life falls into a trance and envisions her in an ethereally beautiful dress and speaking to him Under Her Command (The Bosss Pet, from the other side of a river he cannot cross She tells him that she has risen to an important place by God s side and after uestioning and arguing with her he comes to accept that she is gone and goes to El Gaucho Martín FierroLa vuelta de Martín Fierro follow her to the next life but is jolted awake just before he can make it there Written in old English this translation comes Fragonard Art and Eroticism from Armitage a translator who specializes in medieval writings and it reads like a modern text in his hands This version has the original text on the pages that Mao Zedong face the translation and as unintelligible as old English is to me I enjoyed comparing the two marveling each time how Artmitage has preserved the rhythm and alliteration of the original and made it palatable to modern readers

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Pearl A New Verse Translation

Pearl something that has “slipped away” What follows is a tense fascinating and tender dialogue weaving through the throes of grief toward divine redemption Intricate and endlessly connected Armitage’s lyrical translation is a circular and perfected whole much like the pearl itself. The second of Simon Armitage s Middle English modernisations which I have read As with his updating of Sir Gawain here the guiding principle seems to be the preservation of the original s alliterative uality I enjoyed Sir Gawain but I am less certain about Pearl It is a enigmatic poem of course a dream vision of the City of God of which parts are verbatim reproductions of Bible verse Fundamentally I m not sure the numinous subject matter is so suited to the artificial alliteration as was the pastoral tale of Sir Gawain A description of the hunt of the earthy disembowelling of the kill of the knight s weaponry and habiliments suits the tactile uality which Armitage s language achieves There is none of that in Pearl except for a line near the very beginning in which the narrator imagines his deceased love now clad in clods oh black soil you blot and spoil my precious pearl without a spotAfterwards in a dream vision characteristic of medieval literature we witness a conversation between dreamer and dreamed of father and child It lacks the limpidity which makes the Bible so easy to read and descended at times into to my ears gibbering silliness This was not helped by the poem s elaborate structure broken into twelve line stanzas with first and last lines made to repeat each other and echo into the next Thus we get a regular repetition of priceless pearl and other metaphors pushed past their point of expiry such as the narrator being a jeweller missing his jewel And the dj sound is not the best our language offers to the alliterator consider But gentle jeweller if you are dejectedat the loss of a gem which lent you such joy So begins a twelve line stanza which ends in I judge you to be no natural jeweller All of which gets in the way of emotion and meaning Things pick up towards the end when the conversation stops and we get a very detailed again in the vivid medieval mode portrait of the new Jerusalem This review is of Armitage than the anonymous poet The original was an alliterative piece itself I wonder if it reads easily than this Armitage says that though a contemporary of Chaucer the GawainPearl poet is harder to understand employing a midlands dialect which did not spread so far in time as Chaucer s cosmopolitan vernacular I m sure I ll return to it again in the future

FREE READ Pearl A New Verse Translation

One of our most ingenious interpreters of Middle English Oxford Professor of Poetry Simon Armitage is celebrated for his “compulsively readable” translations New York Times Book Review A perfect complement to his historic translation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Pearl reanimate. Living for lazy mornings like the one I had today I spent a glorious hour with coffee and my current read ignoring all obligations as I immersed myself I then spent a just as blissful evening as I polished off the final few pages and here we are nowPearl is Simon Armitage s translation of the originally untitled poem created in the 1390s and believed to be the work of the same genius who penned Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Pearl is a heart breaking account of a father s grief at the loss of his two year old daughter Upon visiting her grave he falls into a slumber that delivers him to a fantastical oasis and reunites him with his lost childThis was a wonderful if often desolate and heart breaking read and I especially adored the natural focus and clever rhyming schemeThe introduction provided information that further heightened my adoration An example is that the 12 lined stanzas euate to a total of 1212 lines This was a deliberate creation meant to mimic the structure of heavenly Jerusalem which was 12 12 furlongs with 12 gates for the 12 tribes of IsrealFacets like this only made me applaud the original poet all the and Armitage s exemplary recreation here allows for the modern reader to still pay homage to the lost wordsmith


10 thoughts on “Pearl A New Verse Translation

  1. says:

    Living for lazy mornings like the one I had today I spent a glorious hour with coffee and my current read ignoring all obligations as I immersed myself I then spent a just as blissful evening as I polished off the final few pages and here we ar

  2. says:

    A very good Middle English poem about the mystery of God's grace presumed written by whoever wrote Gawain and the Green Knight The poem is at least apparently a consolation for the loss of a loved one The teller of the tale has lost

  3. says:

    Perhaps I would not have read this book had I not have read and loved Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Further I also would not have read Armitages's translation had I not thoroughly relished his own translation of Gawain Of course I had been exposed to both these poems in Tolkien's own versions which are bundled together i

  4. says:

    I read this book as part of the Book Riot Read Harder 2017 Challenge This challenge was to read a book of poetry in translation on a theme other than love Super specificPearl is a translation of a medieval work wr

  5. says:

    I have certain hesitations about any approach to the translation of a rhymed metrical poem that deliberately avoids end rhym

  6. says:

    A beautiful translation of a Middle English poem which explores the loss of a beloved daughter and her father's vision of her in Heaven

  7. says:

    The second of Simon Armitage's Middle English modernisations which I have read As with his updating of Sir Gawain here the guiding principle seems to be the preservation of the original's alliterative uality I enjoyed Sir Gawain but I am less certain about Pearl It is a enigmatic poem of course a dream vision of the City of God of which parts are verbatim reproductions of Bible verse Fundamentally I'm not sure the numinous subject

  8. says:

    Having read Gawain and the Green Knight multiple times with much pleasure I picked up Pearl expecting something amazing After all we’re told the same poet composed this work Unfortunately I was disappointed The poem is all right But it’s a religious vision and with it is a religious dogma and narrow iconography that’s not appealing to me as a non believer Outside of those elements the poem does not have enough of s

  9. says:

    This is an astonishingly accomplished translation

  10. says:

    I love alliterative verse

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