[Waterland [BOOK] Free Read online DOC By Graham Swift


  • Paperback
  • 358
  • Waterland
  • Graham Swift
  • English
  • 04 October 2017
  • null

10 thoughts on “Waterland

  1. says:

    Waterland published in 1983 is a semi postmodern examination of the end of History the trajectory of the promise of the Enlightenment It is set in the 80's but looks backwards through history centering around 1943 It has three different plots in the 40's when the narrator Tom is a teenager it tells of the death of another teenage boy and of the conseuences of fooling around with curious Catholic schoolgirls it sort of s

  2. says:

    This may be one of the most beautifully written books I've ever read A lot of my favorite books some of which I enjoyed even than this one have some combination of good plots good themes or good characters but the uality of the writing leaves something to be desired This is one of those novels that is so expertly crafted that it makes you remember what great writing is The premise of a history teacher who is about to involuntaril

  3. says:

    This is a story about a history teacher Tom Crick He is in his fifties and lives in Greenwich England known for its observatory Greenwich Mean Time and 0° longitude You might say it is where time starts or at least the place by which other times are set This is a book about the importance of history both world history and personal history History hinges upon what came before in timeTom is the narrator of the story He starts in the presen

  4. says:

    Description from Wiki The film follows the story of an anguished English born Pittsburgh high school teacher Irons

  5. says:

    Like the countryside in which it is set I recall this book as being grey depressing and sodden I can't recall a thing that I learned from it all I remember is the enormous sense of relief I had once I managed to finish itThough as the blurb helpfully point out there are eels and incest

  6. says:

    Murder incest guilt insanity ale and eels Hard to imagine not loving a book with themes like that eh? Or is it?Waterland Picador Classic is undeniably an impressive and ambitious novel which ruminates upon history's relentless tide of change and humanity’s subseuent shifting fortunes It’s also firmly rooted in the watery world of the East Anglian Fens the rich and fertile flood plains in which its inhabi

  7. says:

    After Rushdie‘s “The Moor’s Last Sigh” I could only expect that another family saga will end up in my hands Waterland by Graham Swift It was my first plunge into Swift’s waters and I hope that it won't be the last one I only

  8. says:

    What is it about Swift's writing that I find so haunting? Nearly all of his novels are about a middle aged man in an existential crisis and yet I find them deeply arrestingly relatable even as a young happy lady It might be his concise sentence structure or it might be his ability to at the end of the story conne

  9. says:

    Yes there's eels Yes there's incest But importantly there's a subtle flow of history back and forth across the pages from the French Revolution to the nuclear days of WWII Lessons learned from the trials and tribulations of the Crick family can easily be applied to the great events of world history and history itself is shown to be

  10. says:

    Tom Crick now a history teacher is forced into retirement due to an unfortunate and ghastly act committed by his wife Why?Tom Crick asks and seeks answers to a lot of why’s because history rides uncomfortably behind that very word that very monosyllabic uestion – why?It has a strong and veritable bearing on

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Graham Swift á 6 READ

Waterland

Set in the bleak Fen Country of East Anglia and spanning some 240 years in the lives of its haunted narrator and his ancestors Waterland is a book that takes in eels and ince. Waterland published in 1983 is a semi postmodern examination of the end of History the trajectory of the promise of the Enlightenment It is set in the 80 s but looks backwards through history centering around 1943 It has three different plots in the 40 s when the narrator Tom is a teenager it tells of the death of another teenage boy and of the conseuences of fooling around with curious Catholic schoolgirls it sort of screams DON T HAVE PREMARITAL SEX PREMARITAL SEX HAS HORRIBLE PHYSICAL EMOTIONAL AND SUPERNATURAL CONSEUENCES Tom as an adult and his wife s mental collapse and crime and Tom s subseuent forced retirement from the school where he is a history teacher and the history of his family beginning centuries ago Between the two branches of his family there s a great deal of playing with Freud s concepts of melancholia and mourning melancholia the inability to let go of something and move on being stuck in the past refusing to move forward with the future leading to your eventual demise and mourning being the state of moving on of grieving and then getting over it Tom s family has one branch on each side And then it goes into History versus history the big overarching world History versus your own history and how much you re ever a part of History and the collapse of linear time and the fact that although Time God and Hhistory are possibly arbitrary and fictional we still need themThen the incest startsAlso some philosophizing about eelsI m not kidding This book gets a little ridiculous It s a semi Postmodern text examining the difficulty of writing Realism in a Postmodern era but it goes off on romantic not Romantic tangents about natural history and cultural history and all in a very Julian Barnes A History of the World in 10 12 Chapters way Then it goes into creepy Stephen King esue scenes with the children exploring the two great draws in life sex and death The only constants heh I ended up wishing either Stephen King or Julian Barnes had written it and focused on it as it is the tension is uneasy and yet uneasy in a way that really contributes to the novel and its aims Although I do love how the idea of storytelling is played with in this novel the idea that we can t bear reality without the stories we create to endow it with meaning because otherwise reality is too strong too harsh and will overpower us But again that s very BarnesThere is a beautiful passage though which I ll include here Once upon a time people believed in the end of the world Look in the old books see how many times and on how many pretexts the end of the world has been prophesied and foreseen calculated and imagined But that of course was superstition The world grew up It didn t end People threw off superstition as they threw off their parents They said Don t believe that old mumbo jumbo You can change the world you can make it better The heavens won t fall it was true For a little while it didn t start so long ago only a few generations ago the world went through its revolutionary progressive phase and the world believed it would never end it would go on getting better But then the end of the world came back again not as an idea or a belief but as something the world had fashioned for itself all the time it was growing upWhich only goes to show that if the end of the world didn t exist it would be necessary to invent it

READ & DOWNLOAD ¸ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB á Graham Swift

St ale making and madness the heartless sweep of history and a family romance as tormented as any in Greek tragedyWaterland like the Hardy novels carries with all else a prof. Murder incest guilt insanity ale and eels Hard to imagine not loving a book with themes like that eh Or is itWaterland Picador Classic is undeniably an impressive and ambitious novel which ruminates upon history s relentless tide of change and humanity s subseuent shifting fortunes It s also firmly rooted in the watery world of the East Anglian Fens the rich and fertile flood plains in which its inhabitants are forever locked in an ongoing battle with water and which can never be comprehensively won by either side The left side of my brain admired the novel s ambition and scope The right side of my brain remained detached and I was unable to stay immersed Sometimes when I picked this up I thought how good it was however it never truly grabbed me the non linear structure multiple narratives and contrasting styles were ultimately too jarring So whilst clever ambitious and diverse it was a book I admired than enjoyed 35Waterland Picador Classic 1983 by Graham Swift

CHARACTERS Waterland

Ound knowledge of a people a place and their interweaving Swift tells his tale with wonderful contemporary verve and verbal felicity A fine and original work Los Angeles Time. After Rushdie s The Moor s Last Sigh I could only expect that another family saga will end up in my hands Waterland by Graham Swift It was my first plunge into Swift s waters and I hope that it won t be the last one I only regret reading Waterland in Lithuanian instead of its original language and I will not know until I pick up the next book by Swift if my four stars should be attributed to my not fully identifying with the author s voice or the translator sWaterland is a story about storytelling a narrative about narration that analyses the meaning and the necessity of history Children only animals live entirely in the Here and Now Only nature knows neither memory nor history But man let me offer you a definition is the storytelling animal Wherever he goes he wants to leave behind not a chaotic wake not an empty space but the comforting marker buoys and trail signs of stories He has to go on telling stories He has to keep on making them up As long as there s a story it s all right Even in his last moments it s said in the split second of a fatal fall or when he s about to drown he sees passing rapidly before him the story of his whole life And so the protagonist of the book Tom a history teacher in a high school tells us a story About the waterland the low lying fens somewhere in east England About drainage and beer brewing madness and murder coming of age incest abortion and childlessness Swift suggests that history is cyclical that any revolution for a better future is always based on a vision or an adapted reflection of a period of prosperity and wellbeing in the past That a change leads to another change which does not always mean progress That there is also regression and repetition The Fens where the biggest part of the story is based serve Swift as the main metaphor of this cyclicality Despite centuries of efforts to drain and improve the land in the fens the water had always found the way to return through rains and floods bringing disasters to the inhabitants Do we all live in the fens of history I dare to ask And is there to it than trying to keep our heads above the water of its recurring floodsI may or I may not find the answer but I will keep wondering Your Why gives the answer Your demand for explanation provides an explanation Isn t the seeking of reasons itself inevitably an historical process since it must always work backwards from what came after to what came before And so long as we have this itch for explanations must we not always carry round with us this cumbersome but precious bag of clues called history Another definition children Man the animal which demands an explanation the animal which asks Why


About the Author: Graham Swift

Graham Colin Swift FRSL born May 4 1949 is a British author He was born in London England and educated at Dulwich College London ueens' College Cambridge and later the University of York He was a friend of Ted HughesSome of his works have been made into films including Last Orders which starred Michael Caine and Bob Hoskins and Waterland which starred Jeremy Irons Last Orders was a